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Why Hiring a Professional Translator or Interpreter Will Yield Higher Profits for Your Real Estate Business

Beginning a new translation project or finding a trusted interpreter for your law firm can be a daunting task. However, both can be key to your firm’s success with a given case or client. You may also be looking at your budget, wondering how translation and interpreting will fit into it and why it is worth spending the money to hire a professional. When looking to make every dollar count, it is important to know what you are receiving when you have your documents, brochures, website, etc. translated. Below is a brief list of what you can expect to get for your money, other than a good quality translation or interpreter.

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1. A growing client base. Having your documents translated gives your law firm the potential to reach a whole new group of clients. Clients who are not native speakers of English are more likely to engage with you as their lawyer if there is material available in their primary language. It is more comfortable for this individual, and as a result, this person feels at ease with your firm, knowing you are making the effort to reach them directly. These clients could easily turn into raving fans based on your help, recommending you to their friends and family.

2. A smoother client experience. When you have certain information translated your clients’ language and can offer an interpreter during meetings, these individuals will have a much easier time understanding the process. This results in fewer conversations and less time spent explaining next steps (or having an interpreter explain next steps if you do not personally speak their language). Every interaction is a cost to your law firm, especially if you have requested an interpreter be present during your meetings, so reducing these interactions with well-written, translated documents could help you avoid unnecessary costs.

3. Happier, loyal clients and rave reviews. If your materials are translated well and your client has an easy time working with you (and/or your interpreter), he or she will remember the experience and will likely call on you (and recommend you!) again.

4. Increased profits year over year (YOY). The initial investment of translating your materials or working with an interpreter may seem costly to some at first. However, the potential for generating a new client base, along with happier, loyal clients you’ve been able to reach will allow you to turn a profit at your firm in the long run. You should be able to see the great return on investment (ROI) in your YOY profits.

Translation and interpreting are fantastic tools for reaching new markets and building a loyal client base. When considering the ROI for translation and interpreting services, be sure to think mid- to long-term for your firm. Although you may not see a profit right away, the investment is well worth the numbers you will see over the years to come as your client base continues to grow and expand, earning your firm more profit all the while.

How Partnering with a Translation Agency Will Maximize Your Marketing Efforts

Translating your marketing content can have huge benefits for your company, especially if you have partnered with an agency that is well-suited for helping you meet your goals in foreign-language markets.  Here are a few tips for working with a translation agency when it comes to maximizing your marketing campaign efforts:

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1. Know your audience. As important as this is in marketing in general, it’s just as important in translation of marketing materials. Where does the ideal audience live and work? What dialect do they speak? Do a little homework on the group you want to reach so that you can provide this information to the agency you choose for your project.

2. Inquire about localization. Whether your content will be in print, on your website or part of a social media outreach plan, localization encompasses more than the translation of a text to reach a specific population. It incorporates the entire concept of the message via the terminology, language, images, colors, etc. used to be relevant to the audience in a specific region or locale. Localization allows you to avoid promoting content that might be offensive in another culture so that you can truly sell your brand well to consumers.

3. Ask about the translators assigned to your project. The translators who handle your marketing content should specialize in the type of translation you require. You wouldn’t want a medical translator who is a native speaker of Chilean Spanish to translate your site’s digital brochures meant for customers in Mexico City. It is perfectly acceptable to ask your project manager about a translator’s credentials so that you can feel confident the work is in good hands.

4. Don’t leave a translation request for the last minute. As soon as you know about the translation project and have the final document in hand, reach out to the translation agency so that the project manager can begin assembling the right team to handle your specific materials. Be up front about your preferred turn-around time on the project. Allow for adequate time to translate your content accurately and professionally.

5. Feel free to request the same team of linguists if you are pleased. If you are pleased with the work the agency has completed for you in the past for you, it is perfectly okay to ask that they utilize the same translators, editors and proofreaders that handled your previous projects. Agencies keep track of the teams it assigns for each project, and ensuring consistency can be as simple as maintaining the same team to work on projects that require similar terminology and context.

On-Site or Remote Interpreting: Which is the Best Fit for Your Real Estate Business

If your real estate business has been marketing to or attracting speakers of another language, you’ve likely wondered what your best options would be for the most seamless communication method. Communicating with your potential buyers via a professional interpreter is a great way to break an existing communication barrier. Here are some options if you are in need of oral interpretation. Remember, you may decide that you need to choose more than one option to fit your interactions with these buyers.

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On-Site Interpretation. This type of service offering is probably the most commonly sought in our industry. Interpreters are hired to perform this service in person at the time of an arranged appointment or meeting where an LEP (Limited English Proficient) individual or group of people is present and requires an interpreter. Once the interpreter arrives and meets the LEP individual, she will explain to all those involved that she will interpret everything that is said during the meeting.

Telephonic Interpreting. Another very effective form of interpreting, telephonic interpreters are hired when your agency may not need an interpreter on-site or when certain languages are required that are rarely spoken in a geographic area, among other reasons. You may need telephonic interpreting for short, simple communications and quick interactions like scheduling a future appointment or noting information for a later meeting.

Video Remote Interpreting. Another type of remote interpreting, video remote interpreting (VRI) is often used for sign language interactions, as telephonic services would not be effective. It is also becoming more effective in other language pairs. You will need to have video conferencing equipment, or at the very least, a webcam, speakers and a microphone. You and the LEP individual will be able to see the interpreter and she will listen to you through a headset.

Have you used an interpreter before? If so, what interpreting methods have worked well for you? Which would you like to see utilized within your real estate business if you do not already have one of these services available? Let us know!

Should you Localize Your Smartphone Applications as a Manufacturer?

If your manufacturing company has recently launched a Smartphone app, or even if you’ve had an app that’s been out for quite some time, you may be wondering if it would be worth your while to localize it. Localization, in this sense, basically entails adapting your product to another market or set of markets. This could involve language translation, but it could also mean adapting some of the images, colors or audio files within the app, or even the marketing materials you use to promote it.

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If you’ve ever heard the saying, “There’s an app for that,” then you may have an understanding of just how important apps have become in our society. People use them for just about everything. Having a Smartphone application puts your business, quite literally, in the palm of someone’s hand. If well developed, it is convenient for the consumer to use and helps build brand loyalty and trust by delivering the information they need quickly and easily via their phone or other handheld device, just as they need or want it.

If your business markets itself toward different demographics, then it is important that these demographics be represented in all facets of your business, including in the use of your Smartphone app. In fact, according to a 2012 report from Distimo, The Impact of App Translations, a study of 200 iPhone apps that launched in different native languages saw a 128% increase in downloads the week following that launch, and a 26% increase in revenue from these downloads. Applications localized into Chinese, Japanese, and Korean saw the most growth from this update.

Although the US/English app market is still the most dominant market to date, other markets are growing at an impressive rate. In fact, according to the Global Mobile Market Report, global app revenues will reach $80.6 billion by 2020!

Since a user feels most secure reading something in his or her own native tongue, the potential to actively engage and reach these users through a properly localized app can increase exponentially. If a user is interested in your brand and has a basic understanding of English, he may download your non-localized application. However, if he cannot decipher the language of the app well enough to make purchases, he may become more hesitant to use it in the long term than he would an app in his own language. This can easily cause consumers to delete the app and disengage with a brand entirely.

Users value content in their native tongue, and the above statistics help demonstrate the impact that localizing a Smartphone application can have both on your business’ visibility, as well as on revenue. If you are actively working to expand into other markets and demographics, then Smartphone application localization is definitely something worth investigating for your manufacturing company.

Should you Localize Your Smartphone Applications?

If your company has recently launched a Smartphone app, or even if you’ve had an app that’s been out for quite some time, you may be wondering if it would be worth your while to localize it. Localization, in this sense, basically entails adapting your product to another market or set of markets. This could involve language translation, but it could also mean adapting some of the images, colors or audio files within the app, or even the marketing materials you use to promote it.

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If you’ve ever heard the saying, “There’s an app for that,” then you may have an understanding of just how important apps have become in our society. People use them for just about everything. Having a Smartphone application puts your business, quite literally, in the palm of someone’s hand. If well developed, it is convenient for the consumer to use and helps build brand loyalty and trust by delivering the information they need quickly and easily via their phone or other handheld device, just as they need or want it.

If your business markets itself toward different demographics, then it is important that these demographics be represented in all facets of your business, including in the use of your Smartphone app. In fact, according to a 2012 report from Distimo, The Impact of App Translations, a study of 200 iPhone apps that launched in different native languages saw a 128% increase in downloads the week following that launch, and a 26% increase in revenue from these downloads. Applications localized into Chinese, Japanese, and Korean saw the most growth from this update.

Although the US/English app market is still the most dominant market to date, other markets are growing at an impressive rate. In fact, according to the Global Mobile Market Report, global app revenues will reach $80.6 billion by 2020!

Since a user feels most secure reading something in his or her own native tongue, the potential to actively engage and reach these users through a properly localized app can increase exponentially. If a user is interested in your brand and has a basic understanding of English, he may download your non-localized application. However, if he cannot decipher the language of the app well enough to make purchases, he may become more hesitant to use it in the long term than he would an app in his own language. This can easily cause consumers to delete the app and disengage with a brand entirely.

Users value content in their native tongue, and the above statistics help demonstrate the impact that localizing a Smartphone application can have both on your business’ visibility, as well as on revenue. If you are actively working to expand into other markets and demographics, then Smartphone application localization is definitely something worth investigating for your company.

Translation Mistakes to Avoid When Marketing in a Foreign Language

If you are interested in reaching new target markets abroad, or those right here in the U.S. who primarily speak a language other than English, you’ve likely considered translating some of your marketing content. If you’re not sure where to start, don’t worry! Here are four translation mistakes to avoid when marketing to a foreign language consumer group.

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1. Using free translation tools 
In a world where everyone is used to receiving things within an instant, it’s easy to assume translations should be immediately accessible, too; we get it! While free automated translation tools can be okay to use when it comes to some phrases, and can be handy when trying to get the gist of a statement or paragraph, they are not meant for professional translation work.

Your marketing materials likely contain idioms, colloquial language, or phrases with words that could have more than one potential meaning. Machines simply do not have the capabilities to translate 100% accurately or to understand the nuances of language. When approaching a new target demographic, your materials will likely be their first impression of your company, so making it a positive and professional one is key.

2. Not finalizing your source text before sending it off for translation
Having your materials translated is an investment (and one that is certainly worthwhile if you’re reaching out to a new target demographic!). However, there’s no reason it needs to cost more than it has to! Making multiple changes can be costly. You won’t always be able to avoid making changes mid-process but when possible, try to have everything finalized in your source text before you send it off for translation so as to avoid extra costs for updates.

3. Translating names and terms that should be left in the source language
Never translate the name of your business, your trademarked products or proper names that pertain to your business and/or industry. Many times these terms are not commonly known in other languages and may just confuse your customers more. Keep a list of trademarked names and terms that you wish to keep in English so that your translation vendor does not mistakenly attempt to translate these terms.

4. Not localizing your materials
The localization process is a great way to take your translations a step further. Localization ensures that the language, images, layout and more, related to your brand and message, are engaging for your target markets and not offensive or inappropriate in any way. The images and design of your materials are just as important as the text you get translated.

Have you witnessed the consequences of one of these four translation mistakes? Do you have other tips on good practices for translation and localization of marketing materials? Let us know!

How to Appeal to Foreign Real Estate Buyers Based on Current Trends

If you look back 15 to 20 years, you would likely see a trend of foreign buyers who, for the most part, were interested in purchasing luxury real estate or condominiums when investing in real estate here in the United States. However, this trend has changed in recent years, with more and more foreign buyers looking to purchase homes elsewhere. In order to best appeal to foreign buyers, it is important to know what they are looking for in the current housing market. Here are a few tips to appeal to the majority of foreign buyers in today’s purchasing climate.

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1. The majority of foreign buyers are now looking to purchase homes as permanent residents, as opposed to a home where they reside for only part of the year. While there are still many people looking for luxury vacation homes or condos, most (~60%) are actually living full-time in the homes they purchase, either as recent immigrants or with work or student visas. While focusing on non-resident buyers can still be an important and lucrative aspect of your strategy, knowing that the majority are actually looking for something more permanent can help shift that focus to appeal to even more foreign buyers with a  wider range of options.

2. Resident foreign buyers spend more on average than the typical U.S. buyer. A typical buyer will spend roughly $278,000, whereas a typical foreign resident buyer will spend around $473,500. Although not all foreign clients will spend more than your average American buyer, it is worth noting that many will be looking for homes in areas of town where the average price is within this range.

3. Not only are they spending more on average, foreign resident buyers are beginning to purchase homes in suburbs, small towns, and other rural areas more often than they purchase within larger cities. This could largely be accredited to things like a stable family situation and making sure they choose a home in a good school district with safe areas for their children to play, so keep these types of things in mind when looking to appeal to these buyers, especially those with school-age children.

Not every potential client you encounter will fall into the “average foreign buyer” category, of course, so the most important thing to consider will be each and every client’s individual needs and desires when it comes to home ownership. However, knowing what trends are current and on the rise when it comes to home ownership for foreign buyers in the U.S. can help put you a step ahead of your competition when it comes to appealing to this demographic, helping you become a leader in your area when it comes to foreign home buyers.