You've got questions.
We've got solutions.


A BLOG FOR THOSE WITH VISION...


How a Multilingual SEO Plan Benefits Your Marketing Efforts Abroad

Maintaining your company’s website ranking can be a difficult task and a constant challenge. You already know that maximizing your Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is extremely important when it comes to gaining Internet visibility for your company, product or service. So, what happens when you decide to market your product overseas or to a multilingual audience? Will simply translating your website do the trick?

How a Multilingual SEO Plan Benefits Your Marketing Efforts Abroad.png

Ultimately, that answer is no. While translating your website content is of course critical to ensure you connect with your multilingual audience, you will also need to consider a multilingual SEO plan to ensure you even reach that audience. After all, what good is a translated website if no one in your intended market is able to find it? In order for you to get a solid ROI, we’ve compiled a list of items to consider when updating your SEO strategy to take your brand global.

Get to know your multilingual audience to ensure SEO results

Your new market will certainly have an entirely different set of customs and culture than your U.S.-based or English-speaking audience. Choose keywords and phrases that you know they would use in search engines. To determine your keywords, figure out what is important to this consumer base.  What are their challenges and pain points? How can you help solve them? If you do not already know this new market inside and out, be sure to find someone who does. Skimping here could mean a particularly negative impact on your website traffic, and therefore, your bottom line.

Analyze competitors who have gone before you

Researching competitors’ success when connecting with the same audience you’re looking to reach is a great step to figuring out what works (and what doesn’t). While you don’t want to copy what a competitor has done, it is vital to understand best/worst practices in advance if the information is already available to you.

Use location settings to your advantage in your SEO strategy

When coming up with a new SEO strategy for foreign markets, don’t neglect to include the country, city, or even the region your new target market is in when deciding on keywords to pair with your product. People tend to use “near me” or city names in their search when trying to find a product they’d like to purchase or browse for online. Having the location information in your SEO setup will help your site appear more often search engines.

Figuring up a brand new SEO strategy for your international or non-English speaking market can be difficult, but you don’t have to do it alone. Did you know we offer website audits? We’d be glad to take a look at yours and help create a strategy for your international growth! Feel free to reach out if you’d like to be in this one together.

If you found this information useful, you may also like:

How to Use SEO for Your Multilingual Audience

What if I Just Use the Google Translate Button On My Website?

A Step-By-Step Plan: Marketing to Speakers of Other Languages

With 2019 in full swing, you’re likely considering new ways to market your business. Have you ever thought about reaching out to and marketing directly to speakers of languages other than English? Even if you only speak English, don’t worry. You don’t actually have to speak another language to effectively market to a demographic that does. You can market to this audience in a variety of ways, which can have a positive impact on your brand this year (and beyond!). Here are 5 steps for targeting your non-English speaking client base in 2019.

Step by Step Plan for Marketing to Speakers of Other Languages (1).png

1. Start with translating your website.

Your website is the best way to interact with customers who do not speak English. Customers will most likely start their online search for a product or service by searching for those with information available in their preferred or primary language. If your website and offerings are translated and localized on your website, your target market will feel confident in your ability to assist them, and they will appreciate that you’ve taken the time to tailor your content to them. Be sure to use a professional translator or agency to handle this. Errors caused by free, automated translation tools can be extreme and do real damage to your brand.

2. Consider multilingual SEO strategy.

While your site is undergoing translation, you’ll want to consider a multilingual Search Engine Optimization (SEO) strategy. After all, it needs to be compatible with the terms your target audience is actually searching for! If your translated website content isn’t showing up in search results, the translation you’re investing in will certainly not give you the best bang for your buck. Analyze your audience and tailor your strategy to them. You’ll find that it often differs from what you’ve already created for your English-speaking customers. Work with your translation provider to ensure they know about your SEO strategy while creating your foreign-language website content.

3. Don’t forget about your local foreign-language market!

While online marketing is important, it is not the only way to reach your new audience. Partner with local businesses in your community, specifically those who already have an existing customer base in your target demographic. See if you can leave your business cards or brochures there as well. Don’t forget to translate and localize your hard-copy marketing content, too!

4. Consider reaching out with a translated targeted email campaign.

If you already send out email newsletters, consider translating them for your non-English-speaking readers. You may not have to translate everything within your newsletter, but if you know your customer's email address and preferred language/region, you can target your content specifically to that group! Email blasts in someone’s preferred language are more likely to drive traffic to your website and are a quick and easy way to stay in touch with those who have already decided they trust you enough to hand over their email address!

BONUS TIP #1! Don’t forget to ask for referrals or testimonials you can use in your marketing or on your website. Once you’ve driven more traffic there, it’s a great way for new and/or potential customers to see why working with you is such a wonderful option. Don’t worry about asking; most people love giving their opinion and will happily do so for you!

5. Remember to translate your print marketing materials.

Dedicate some advertising dollars to one or two of the most widely read publications in your area, ensuring the advertisements you place are localized for your non-English-speaking audience. You can direct customers to your website for more information, which will help drive traffic and deliver more information to your target audience.

BONUS TIP #2! Utilize interpreters as needed for your new customers.Once a new customer reaches out to you, make sure you have a way to communicate with them if you do not already speak their primary language. You can use over-the-phone interpreters for initial meetings or unscheduled calls, and look into requesting an on-site interpreter for client meetings or any interaction that involves contracts, providing more information, etc.

In short, keep an open mind when it comes to your marketing strategy to a foreign-language market. Like all strategies, it will take time to set the moving parts in place. But the growth you’ll see from marketing to a new demographic will be worth it!

If you found this information useful, you may also like:

Provide Value: Translating Parts of Your Newsletter For Your Customers

Translating and Localizing your Website on a Budget: Where to Begin

5 Tips for Creating Effective Print Marketing Materials For a Foreign Market

Now that you’ve decided to expand into a foreign market, creating properly localized and unique print marketing materials can really help you market your business successfully there. Whether the materials you create are print, digital or both, you know how important it is to gear it toward your target demographic and customer base. Here are a few tips to for creating the best possible print materials for a successful marketing campaign.

5 Tips for Creating Effective Print Marketing Materials For a Foreign Market (1).png
  • Get to know your foreign-language consumers. Ask yourself, “What’s important to my customers and how can it be incorporated into our print materials?” Customs and preferences in your target foreign market may be different than what your U.S.-based customers experience, so be sure to take that into account. Also, a professional translation of your marketing content in the language your target audience primarily speaks is essential, even if English is prevalent in that country or region. There is plenty of research to support that consumers feel most comfortable consuming information in their primary language, so the translation piece of this marketing puzzle is critical.

  • · Select the right visuals for your foreign-market materials. What works in print marketing materials for your U.S.-based customers will not necessarily work for a foreign audience. Although it may be easier to just use the same images that you already chose for your U.S.-based customers, it’s important to choose visuals that fit seamlessly into your target market’s culture. Select images that represent them so that they connect and engage with your brand through your marketing! Remember, however, to be careful not to display images that portray cultural or gender stereotypes, as these might not be well-received.

  • Organization is key – optimize your selling points! As with any brochure, there should be a clear and clean flow of text and images that tell your business’ story. Make them as enticing as possible so that potential customers will feel engaged with your content. Use catchy headlines that are relevant to your target market and will “speak” to them. Remember, these headlines may be different than the ones you used for your U.S. consumers! Once you have their attention, show them how your business will benefit their work or lifestyle.

  • Choose relevant content for your foreign-language market. Share information that is both useful and concise. If readers see a lot of text immediately, they may not be inclined to read it all. White space is vital to maintain in your marketing visuals. Keep in mind that some text will be longer once translated, and some shorter, depending on the language. Spanish translations, for example, are often about 30% longer than their original English content, so be sure to consider this when deciding what to include and how your customers’ eyes will “travel” across the page.

  • Make it simple for them to respond to you! If potential customers are interested in your content, it’s important to be easy to contact or find, as most people won’t go out of their way to do so. They need to know what action to take next and how to reach you, whether it be to purchase your product or service, or to get more information. List your business name, phone number, website, and social media channels on the marketing materials for an easy connection. If you have someone who can help customers in their own language, make sure this is clear so they feel comfortable reaching out. If you don’t, not to worry. A telephonic interpreting service could be the answer.

Remember, every piece of literature you send out represents your business and leaves an impression on potential customers, so your goal is to make this impression a positive one from the start! If you are unsure how to effectively localize your brochures and other promotional materials, be sure to choose a professional company to help you with the process. This will help avoid potential blunders with content in unfamiliar foreign markets.

If you found this information useful, you may also like:

Localization Fails in International Markets: Don't Let This Be You!

How Partnering with a Translation Agency Will Maximize Your Marketing Efforts

5 Tips for Creating Effective Brochures For a Foreign Market

Once you decide to expand into a foreign market, creating a properly localized and unique brochure can really help you market your business successfully there. Whether the brochure you create is print or digital (or both!), it should be geared toward your target demographic in that market. Here are a few tips to for creating the best possible brochure for a successful marketing campaign.

creating effective brochures in foreign markets | Accessible Translation Solutions | www.accessibletranslations.com

· Get to know your customer. Ask yourself, “What’s important to them and how can it be incorporated into our brochure?” Take into consideration customs and preferences in that market that may be different than what your U.S.-based customers experience. Also, make sure the brochure is professionally translated and in the language your target audience primarily speaks, even if English is prevalent in that country or region. There is plenty of research to support that consumers feel most comfortable consuming information in their primary language, so the translation piece of the puzzle is critical.

· Select appropriate images. What works in brochures to target your U.S.-based customers will not necessarily work for a foreign audience. Use images that fit seamlessly into your target market’s culture instead of using the same images that you would for your U.S.-based audience. Remember, however, to be careful not to display images that portray stereotypes, as they might not be well received.

· Make sure the brochure is organized to optimize your selling points. As with any brochure, there should be a clear and clean flow of text and images that tell your business’ story. Make them as enticing as possible so that potential customers will feel engaged with your content. Use catchy headlines that are relevant to your target market and will draw them in. Once you have their attention, show them how your business can benefit their work or lifestyle.

· Choose content wisely. Share information that is both useful for your readers, as well as concise. If people see too much text immediately, they may not be inclined to read it all. You could even lose them all together. Keep in mind that some text will be longer once translated, and some shorter, depending on the language. Spanish translations, for example,  are often about 30% longer than their original English content, so be sure to consider this when deciding what to include.

· Make it simple to respond. If potential customers are interested in your content, it’s important to be easy to contact or find. They need to know what action to take next and how to reach you, whether it be to purchase your product or service, or to get more information. List your business name, phone number, website, and social media channels on the brochure for an easy connection. If you have someone who can help customers in their own language, make sure they know that so they feel comfortable reaching out. If you don’t, not to worry. A telephonic interpreting service could be the answer. You don’t have to speak your customers’ primary language in order to do business with them.

Remember, every piece of literature you send out represents your business and leaves an impression on potential customers. If you are unsure how effectively localize your brochures and other promotional materials, be sure to choose a professional company to help you with the process. This will help avoid potential blunders with content in unfamiliar foreign markets.

How To Involve Students' Parents Who Speak Foreign Languages in End-of-Year Celebrations and Events

As this quarter and semester come to an end, it's time to start thinking about those end-of-calendar-year celebrations your school puts on for students and their families. Whether these celebrations include classroom parties or outdoor game days, having parents around as volunteers can be helpful (and necessary!) to make sure everything runs smoothly. As you start to prepare these fun and interactive events on your school's campus, consider making some simple, but special, efforts to include those parents who may not speak English and may or may not have the same cultural customs as we do here in the United States.

So, how do you inform these parents of what's going on and how do you get them involved? We have some simple tips that you can put in place in the next month or so that we know will make a difference in their involvement!

pexels-photo-296301.jpeg

1. Start thinking now about the notes you will send home with your students and any social media messages you will post to school-specific groups and channels.

Do you have a series of notifications you send out to let parents know about the special activities and events coming up to celebrate specific holidays or end-of-year events? Consider having these announcements professionally translated so that these parents know you're making efforts to include them and inform them about what's going on in their children's classrooms. Be careful not to use any automated tools for this, as your translation will likely come back riddled with mistakes. If children need to bring something specific to class or to an activity or meal, these are important details to relay in the parents' primary language. After all, no child likes to show up to school empty-handed when his/her peers are prepared.

2. Ask for volunteers in order to get parents interested and involved. 

Many parents whose primary language is not English may seem uninterested in what's going on at their children's schools, when in reality, they just don't have the information they need in their language. Most parents are happy to be involved and asked to take part in their children's activities. So, while you're at it, ask them if they'd like volunteer to hand out art supplies for a special holiday project, bring a favorite dish, or prepare an activity. You may even have the opportunity to learn more about this family's culture just by having them share something special to them that pertains to a certain holiday or season.

3. Say "thanks".

A gesture that is absolutely universal across all languages and cultures is saying "thanks". Take a moment to recognize these parents and family members at the event/celebration so that they know you appreciate their time and work. You might even prepare a small token of your appreciation with a thank-you note in their language. It may seem like a small gesture, but these are the types of details that will keep these parents coming back and getting more involved in their children's school activities.

Finally, think outside the box. If you know that the end of the year also lines up with a holiday that several families in your student population celebrate, ask them to come to their children's classrooms and share their traditions and a special activity or dish with the class. Not only will they be touched that you asked, but the other students in the classroom will be intrigued by this extra opportunity to learn something new.

If you have any special announcements, social media posts or informational materials you'd like to send out to students' parents who speak other languages, feel free to request a free consultation. We'd be happy to help with your end-of-year fun!

What is Localization and Why Should It Matter to My Company?

Localization, often abbreviated as L10N, is the process of adapting a product to a specific locale or culture. Having your product localized can make a huge difference in ensuring that it is perceived well in the market you are trying to reach. It is easy to think translating your product is enough. Although translation is a part of localization, it is only one step in the process. Knowing what to consider when deciding whether or not to localize your product could take your company to the next level and increase your bottom line.

 As mentioned, translation is part of the localization process. Translating your source text into the language your intended audience speaks is critical as to whether or not they will understand it. Therefore, having a text translated into a target audience’s native language is key. However, it is not the only step to consider. If you expect your product to reach other audiences, especially overseas, ask your translation vendor about the localization process and how it may benefit your particular product.

Burger King's Steakhouse Burger was introduced to Argentina with this colorful advertisement, which included the pronunciation of "Steakhouse" and pricing in pesos. As Argentina is known for its beef, the content of the burger did not need to be adapted. (Photo: Madalena Sánchez Zampaulo, Buenos Aires, 2011)

So, if localization is not just translation, what more does it include? Let’s take the idea of a company’s website. If your company launches a website in the United States, but wants to begin shipping the items to other countries, there are several items to consider. First, decide which country or countries are in your target market. In this case, your company decides to begin shipping to the United Kingdom and Mexico. You know you need to translate the website into Spanish for the Mexican audience, but what else? This is where localization comes in. Here are a few things to consider when localizing your website to these particular markets:

  • Language
  1. Even though English is also the official language of the UK, it is a different variant of English than that spoken in the United States. Many terms and phrases that work well in North American English do not mean the same thing in the UK. Localization can help avoid potentially confusing terms or phrases, as well as let the readers know that the text was written with them in mind.
  2. Simply using a Spanish-language translator for the Mexican audience may not be enough. Just as English in the UK is different than English in the United States, Mexican Spanish will be different than the Spanish spoken in other Latin American countries or in Spain. Proper localization will ensure the translator is fluent in Mexican Spanish to ensure the language meets the needs of your intended audience.
  • Currency

    A product that costs $50 USD will cost 650.14 Mexican Pesos or 29.38 British Pounds (as of June 27, 2014). Your company must ensure your website converts these prices properly and charges enough to cover the added cost of international shipping, if you so desire. This will help drive more sales in your international market. Consumers will be more likely to purchase the product if the prices are listed in their own currency.

  • Formatting/Design
  1. Text that fits properly on your current website may not fit the layout of the translated version. When translating from English to Spanish, the space needed tends to be more. The localization team will help ensure text boxes are expanded to allow for the text to fit on the page without displaying a messy layout on the website itself.
  2. Localizing the graphics for your intended audience is also important. If part of your site contains a graphic showing children playing baseball in front of an American flag, it may not hold the same appeal overseas. The localization team suggest using a graphic with children playing soccer in front of the Mexican flag, for example. Changes like these will help continue to drive traffic to your site if consumers feel like the page is geared toward them.

There are many more factors to take into account when localizing content. A few other points to consider are changing the format of dates, addresses, and telephone numbers, changing color schemes if there are local color sensitivities, etc. A properly localized product will look as though it was developed within the local culture and not simply translated for a basic understanding of the text. Your product will have much more appeal to audiences within these locales if localized properly. Talk to your translation vendor to determine whether or not localization services are provided and what specific benefits it could have for your particular project, as well as for your brand.