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Quality Assurance in Translation: 3 Tips for Making Sure the Process Works for Your Real Estate Business

Quality Assurance (QA), or the process of ensuring that the translation you request is the best quality possible when returned to you, should be promised by all language providers. If you are in the market for a translation, you are likely wondering what makes the QA process from one provider different from that of another. More importantly, you may also be wondering how this process will work for your translation project in particular. Here are three tips to help you feel more confident that your provider’s QA process works for your agency.

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1. Ask about the overall process before you contract the provider. This can save you a lot of time and worry throughout the process if you know what to expect up front. Interview the provider and find out how the they will work to ensure the translation will be accurate and free of errors, and what their assessment process is like when they review your documents before delivery. Make sure they are able to work with linguists who specialize in the type of translations you require (and feel free to ask for their credentials). You should hear answers about the process that ensure proofreading, editing, final revisions and collaboration among the linguists who will work on your project. If you see any red flags, this could be a sign to shop elsewhere.

2. Require that changes made to the text be handled by the linguists themselves. This may seem apparent, but there are providers who will request more information from the linguist as they prepare your documents for delivery without having the linguist review the actual file. Ask that all revisions to files be made directly by the linguist (not over the phone, not via an instant email message or chat, but to the document itself). This way, you can rest assured that the linguist was able to review the file in its entirety when making the revision, which is crucial in the QA process. Without complete context, one might not have enough information to properly revise a phrase or paragraph, and this is where errors and inconsistencies can easily occur.

3. Ask what tools your provider uses in the QA process. Does your provider keep client-specific glossaries, Translation Memories (TMs) and a style guide on hand and provide these to the linguists who will work on the project? Will your provider be willing to work with your in-country reviewers if you have them? What evaluations does the provider have for its linguists and how are they reevaluated for their work?

These three tips will help you to understand the translation process and quality assurance of translations more and help you decide if the process works for you specifically, as you choose the best provider for your agency. Quality Assurance processes are found in all industries, and the translation and interpreting industry is no different.

Quality Assurance in Translation: 3 Tips for Making Sure the Process Works for Your Manufacturing Company

Quality Assurance (QA), or the process of ensuring that the translation you request is the best quality possible when returned to you, should be promised by all language providers. If you are in the market for a translation, you are likely wondering what makes the QA process from one provider different from that of another. More importantly, you may also be wondering how this process will work for your translation project in particular. Here are three tips to help you feel more confident that your provider’s QA process works for your company.

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1. Ask about the overall process before you contract the provider. This can save you a lot of time and worry throughout the process if you know what to expect up front. Interview the provider and find out how the they will work to ensure the translation will be accurate and free of errors, and what their assessment process is like when they review your documents before delivery. Make sure they are able to work with linguists who specialize in the technical translations your company requires (and feel free to ask for their credentials). You should hear answers about the process that ensure proofreading, editing, final revisions and collaboration among the linguists who will work on your project. If you see any red flags, this could be a sign to shop elsewhere.

2. Require that changes made to the text be handled by the linguists themselves. This may seem apparent, but there are providers who will request more information from the linguist as they prepare your documents for delivery without having the linguist review the actual file. Ask that all revisions to files be made directly by the linguist (not over the phone, not via an instant email message or chat, but to the document itself). This way, you can rest assured that the linguist was able to review the file in its entirety when making the revision, which is crucial in the QA process. Without complete context, one might not have enough information to properly revise a phrase or paragraph, and this is where errors and inconsistencies can easily occur.

3. Ask what tools your provider uses in the QA process. Does your provider keep client-specific glossaries, Translation Memories (TMs) and a style guide on hand and provide these to the linguists who will work on the project? Will your provider be willing to work with your in-country reviewers if you have them? What evaluations does the provider have for its linguists and how are they reevaluated for their work?

These three tips will help you to understand the translation process and quality assurance of translations more and help you decide if the process works for you specifically, as you choose the best provider for your company. Quality Assurance processes are found in all industries, and the translation and interpreting industry is no different.

Quality Assurance in Translation: 3 Tips for Making Sure the Process Works for Your Law Firm or Practice

Quality Assurance (QA), or the process of ensuring that the translation you request is the best quality possible when returned to you, should be promised by all language providers. If you are in the market for a translation, you are likely wondering what makes the QA process from one provider different from that of another. More importantly, you may also be wondering how this process will work for your translation project in particular. Here are three tips to help you feel more confident that your provider’s QA process works for your law firm.

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1. Ask about the overall process before you contract the provider. This can save you a lot of time and worry throughout the process if you know what to expect up front. Interview the provider and find out how the they will work to ensure the translation will be accurate and free of errors, and what their assessment process is like when they review your documents before delivery. Make sure they are able to work with linguists who specialize in legal translations (and feel free to ask for their credentials). You should hear answers about the process that ensure proofreading, editing, final revisions and collaboration among the linguists who will work on your project. If you see any red flags, this could be a sign to shop elsewhere.

2. Require that changes made to the text be handled by the linguists themselves. This may seem apparent, but there are providers who will request more information from the linguist as they prepare your documents for delivery without having the linguist review the actual file. Ask that all revisions to files be made directly by the linguist (not over the phone, not via an instant email message or chat, but to the document itself). This way, you can rest assured that the linguist was able to review the file in its entirety when making the revision, which is crucial in the QA process. Without complete context, one might not have enough information to properly revise a phrase or paragraph, and this is where errors and potential inconsistencies can easily occur.

3. Ask what tools your provider uses in the QA process. Does your provider keep client-specific glossaries, Translation Memories (TMs) and a style guide on hand and provide these to the linguists who will work on the project? Will your provider be willing to work with your in-country reviewers if you have them? What evaluations does the provider have for its linguists and how are they reevaluated for their work?

These three tips will help you to understand the translation process and quality assurance of translations more and help you decide if the process works for you specifically, as you choose the best provider for your firm. Quality Assurance processes are found in all industries, and the translation and interpreting industry is no different.

Translation Mistakes to Avoid When Marketing in a Foreign Language

If you are interested in reaching new target markets abroad, or those right here in the U.S. who primarily speak a language other than English, you’ve likely considered translating some of your marketing content. If you’re not sure where to start, don’t worry! Here are four translation mistakes to avoid when marketing to a foreign language consumer group.

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1. Using free translation tools 
In a world where everyone is used to receiving things within an instant, it’s easy to assume translations should be immediately accessible, too; we get it! While free automated translation tools can be okay to use when it comes to some phrases, and can be handy when trying to get the gist of a statement or paragraph, they are not meant for professional translation work.

Your marketing materials likely contain idioms, colloquial language, or phrases with words that could have more than one potential meaning. Machines simply do not have the capabilities to translate 100% accurately or to understand the nuances of language. When approaching a new target demographic, your materials will likely be their first impression of your company, so making it a positive and professional one is key.

2. Not finalizing your source text before sending it off for translation
Having your materials translated is an investment (and one that is certainly worthwhile if you’re reaching out to a new target demographic!). However, there’s no reason it needs to cost more than it has to! Making multiple changes can be costly. You won’t always be able to avoid making changes mid-process but when possible, try to have everything finalized in your source text before you send it off for translation so as to avoid extra costs for updates.

3. Translating names and terms that should be left in the source language
Never translate the name of your business, your trademarked products or proper names that pertain to your business and/or industry. Many times these terms are not commonly known in other languages and may just confuse your customers more. Keep a list of trademarked names and terms that you wish to keep in English so that your translation vendor does not mistakenly attempt to translate these terms.

4. Not localizing your materials
The localization process is a great way to take your translations a step further. Localization ensures that the language, images, layout and more, related to your brand and message, are engaging for your target markets and not offensive or inappropriate in any way. The images and design of your materials are just as important as the text you get translated.

Have you witnessed the consequences of one of these four translation mistakes? Do you have other tips on good practices for translation and localization of marketing materials? Let us know!

How to Appeal to Foreign Real Estate Buyers Based on Current Trends

If you look back 15 to 20 years, you would likely see a trend of foreign buyers who, for the most part, were interested in purchasing luxury real estate or condominiums when investing in real estate here in the United States. However, this trend has changed in recent years, with more and more foreign buyers looking to purchase homes elsewhere. In order to best appeal to foreign buyers, it is important to know what they are looking for in the current housing market. Here are a few tips to appeal to the majority of foreign buyers in today’s purchasing climate.

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1. The majority of foreign buyers are now looking to purchase homes as permanent residents, as opposed to a home where they reside for only part of the year. While there are still many people looking for luxury vacation homes or condos, most (~60%) are actually living full-time in the homes they purchase, either as recent immigrants or with work or student visas. While focusing on non-resident buyers can still be an important and lucrative aspect of your strategy, knowing that the majority are actually looking for something more permanent can help shift that focus to appeal to even more foreign buyers with a  wider range of options.

2. Resident foreign buyers spend more on average than the typical U.S. buyer. A typical buyer will spend roughly $278,000, whereas a typical foreign resident buyer will spend around $473,500. Although not all foreign clients will spend more than your average American buyer, it is worth noting that many will be looking for homes in areas of town where the average price is within this range.

3. Not only are they spending more on average, foreign resident buyers are beginning to purchase homes in suburbs, small towns, and other rural areas more often than they purchase within larger cities. This could largely be accredited to things like a stable family situation and making sure they choose a home in a good school district with safe areas for their children to play, so keep these types of things in mind when looking to appeal to these buyers, especially those with school-age children.

Not every potential client you encounter will fall into the “average foreign buyer” category, of course, so the most important thing to consider will be each and every client’s individual needs and desires when it comes to home ownership. However, knowing what trends are current and on the rise when it comes to home ownership for foreign buyers in the U.S. can help put you a step ahead of your competition when it comes to appealing to this demographic, helping you become a leader in your area when it comes to foreign home buyers.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Translating Your Law Firm’s Website

When aiming to appeal to a demographic that does not primarily speak English, one of the first things you may want to consider is translating your law firm’s website into the languages you’re targeting. This is a great step to take in reaching new potential clients, but there are a few common mistakes you’ll want to avoid when beginning this process.

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1. Relying on an automatic translation tool like Google Translate. We understand how tempting it is to choose a “free” option like Google Translate when trying to trim costs. However, when your potential clients are looking for legal assistance, they want to use someone who is professional and trustworthy. If the information on your website is translated poorly (or completely mistranslated, which is often the case with automated translation) because it was handled by a machine, the individuals you are targeting are likely to continue searching elsewhere for help. Make sure your website is translated by a professional and experienced team so that your website’s tone is competent and worthy of their time from the moment they click onto your site. Professionals will also be able to help you localize the content for the exact market you want to reach.

2. Failing to translate contact information and lawyer biography pages. Sometimes you may wish to tackle website translation in different stages, which means some of the links within the site may be neglected on the first round so that the information you find to be most relevant for your law firm is translated first. One thing we recommend translating from the beginning that may be overlooked is the contact page and the lawyer biography section(s). Knowing who will be helping them on their legal journey is often critical for potential clients, so the more they can get to know and trust you from reading your biography page, the more confident they will feel about why you are the right person to help them. It is also crucial for potential clients to understand how to get in contact with you, so keep the contact page in mind when translating your website as well.

3. Having no one available to speak to them in their native language when they call. You don’t have to speak the languages of your target clients personally to be able to assist them when they call for more information, nor do you have to have a bilingual assistant available for these calls (though you certainly can!). Another option is to invest in a telephonic interpreting service plan so that you can be connected with an interpreter over the phone the moment you need one, and your potential client can feel more confident from their initial phone conversation with you. When it’s time to follow-up with an in-person meeting, reach out to your language service provider and schedule an on-site interpreter to assist you.

4. Not accounting for a foreign-language SEO strategy. Translating your website is vital for reaching new potential clients who do not speak English. However, it is not enough if your target clients cannot find you when searching online. You’ll want to choose keywords and phrases, for example, that your new audience will use when searching for legal assistance, to be sure your website turns up in those search results. When it doubt, seek professional help to ensure you are implementing the best foreign-language SEO strategy to get your law firm’s new foreign-language website launched and seen.